Questioning the Unquestionable

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This month, our cover story involves a murder. This may be common in some publications, but it’s not a topic we delve into often. I suppose we should be thankful for that. Most of the challenges we face are of a less violent variety.

The thing that struck me about this murder was the fact that it wasn’t just some drunken argument that got tragically out of hand. If the allegations are true, this was a pre-planned ambush. In my mind, it’s hard to imagine anyone being capable of something so cold and brutal. I want to know what the killer was thinking. At what point in the decision-making process did he or she evaluate all of the options and determine homicide was the best one? We may eventually learn the motives, but no matter what they are, I doubt I will truly understand.


Skyline Rallies Past Upset-Minded Longhorns

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Darrell White had three touchdowns for W.T. White on Thursday, but the Longhorns fell to Skyline in overtime. (Photo: Chris McGathey)

Darrell White had three touchdowns for W.T. White on Thursday, but the Longhorns fell to Skyline in overtime. (Photo: Chris McGathey)

W.T. White players and coaches probably left Forester Stadium with mixed emotions on Thursday night. They could take pride in a valiant effort against a perennial powerhouse, while also lamenting the missed opportunity to pull an upset against a rival that has dominated them in recent years.

Velton Gardner threw a touchdown pass with 17 seconds left in regulation, then another in overtime as Skyline rallied past the Longhorns 52-45 in the District 9-6A opener.

Gardner’s 22-yard pass to Jarvis Williams tied the score, and his 17-yard strike to Travion Randolph turned out to be the game-winner for the Raiders (1-3, 1-0) after Eriq Senters intercepted a WTW pass to end the game.

Gardner threw three touchdown passes and also rushed for 132 yards and a fourth-quarter score that helped Skyline come back from a late 10-point deficit.


Mystery Shrouds Lawyer’s Death After Homicide Ruling

Courtesy CBS 11 0
Courtesy CBS 11

More than a month after the Dallas County Medical Examiner’s office concluded Preston Hollow attorney Ira Tobolowsky died from “thermal burns and smoke inhalation in association with blunt force trauma,” questions remain unanswered about who would want to murder the 68-year-old.

“This is an active and ongoing investigation, and we are not releasing any details related to this matter at this point in time,” Dallas Fire-Rescue Public Information Officer Jason Evans said.

Tobolowsky was found dead May 13 on the floor of his garage. Local news reports at the time quote fire officials saying the fire “seemed suspicious.” Dallas police assigned a homicide investigator to the case shortly thereafter.


Your Daily Dose, At Your Doorstep

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Organizing and keeping track of vitamins can be challenging for those always on the go. Two recent TCU graduates are trying to change that.

Their new company, vitafive, sends clients 28 customized daily vitamin packs with their name printed on each bag at their doorsteps every four weeks.

“They’re all gummy vitamins, so it’s way more convenient,” co-founder Nik Hall said. “You can choose from one of our pre-made health packs or customize your own. We have a registered dietician on staff, and she does all of the health packs and combinations.”


Cottages at Hickory Crossing to House 50 of Dallas’ Most Chronically Homeless

It is far more expensive to leave people on the streets than to give them homes. (Photo by Annie Wiles) 0
It is far more expensive to leave people on the streets than to give them homes. (Photo by Annie Wiles)

CitySquare ceremonially unlocked the doors on Sept. 8 to the Cottages at Hickory Crossing, a housing project more than 10 years in the making that will get 50 of the most chronically homeless people in Dallas off the streets.

The Cottages, a complex of 50 fully outfitted, 400-square-foot houses, will not only provide permanent homes to their new residents, but also, CitySquare hopes, provide a roadmap to developing a Housing First approach to homelessness across Texas.

The model that “the solution to homelessness is homes,” a line echoed by both Mayor Mike Rawlings and County Judge Clay Jenkins at the unlocking ceremony, sounds simple – but getting people into homes is anything but.

Rawlings, who created the Dallas Commission on Homelessness after Dallas shut down Tent City in May, is pushing for the city to find a long-term solution to Dallas’ homelessness crisis, which he has called a humanitarian issue.


DISD Board Shake Up: Trustees Choose Third President This Year

Dan Mecciche on the first day of school (Courtesy DISD) 0
Dan Mecciche on the first day of school (Courtesy DISD)

The Dallas ISD board of trustees began the new school year by voting out the president they elected only three months before.

During the Aug. 25 meeting, the board voted 5-4 to elect District 3 trustee Dan Micciche its new president. He replaced District 5 trustee Lew Blackburn, who assumed the office in May.

The vote appeared to be retaliation for Blackburn’s opposition to a proposed 13-cent property tax hike that failed during a special meeting Aug. 18. If the measure had passed, voters would have decided in November whether to fund a number of new programs and teacher pay changes.


Police Reports: Sept. 12-18

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Dallas

12 MONDAY
Between 5:30 and 8:30 a.m., a burglar broke into a vehicle in the 3800 block of West Northwest Highway and stole property.

 Between 11:30 and 11:44 a.m., a burglar broke into a vehicle in the 5350 block of West Lovers Lane and stole property.

Between 1:30 and 1:50 p.m., two shoplifters stole merchandise from Macy’s at NorthPark Center. Anita Hammie, 28, and Lemont Larelous, 19, were arrested on a charge of theft.


Normal’s Just a Cycle on a Washing Machine

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By the time this goes to press, we will have survived the political conventions, the Olympics (without doping or Zika, hopefully) and most of the triple-digit heat. People will be streaming back to town back to their normal lives. Whatever normal is. Nobody’s quite sure these days, although a whole lot of people feel like the whole world is spinning out of control.

I was in college during the ‘60s for the student revolution, the anti-war movement, civil rights protests, and drug culture, which rocked not only our nation but much of Europe as well. Political assassinations, the moonwalk, hippies, psychedelic music, and drugs made my senior year on campus very different from my freshman year. My parents’ generation was pretty sure the sky was falling, and they had lived through their own cataclysmic coming of age with the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and World War II. People protest that these times are much more frightening because of the sheer violence and the globalization of problems with social media.


Walt Humann: Dallas “has neglected Fair Park”

University Park resident Walt Humann, founder of Fair Park Texas Foundation, wants to manage Fair Park through a public-private partnership with the city of Dallas. (Photo: Josh Blaylock for D Magazine) 0
University Park resident Walt Humann, founder of Fair Park Texas Foundation, wants to manage Fair Park through a public-private partnership with the city of Dallas. (Photo: Josh Blaylock for D Magazine)

During the debate over Fair Park’s future, questions have been raised at Dallas City Hall over how involved someone from the Park Cities should be in Dallas city affairs.

During a city council briefing Aug. 29, Scott Griggs, representative of District 1, challenged University Park resident Walt Humann to move to Dallas within one year if he wants to run Fair Park.

Humann, who founded the Fair Park Texas Foundation, will serve as chairman of a nine-person board that will manage Fair Park through a public-private partnership with the city if council approves his plan. But Griggs said he “would like to see all Dallas residents on the board.”

His stipulation was not far out of line with concerns raised by other councilmembers over transparency, representation of Fair Park’s neighboring communities, and a private outfit’s lack of accountability to South Dallas constituencies.

But Humann shrugged off Griggs’ challenge as “just politics downtown.”

Humann, who is a former Hunt Oil executive, argues that his decades of civic engagement in South Dallas should matter more than where he lives.