I Chose My Own Adventure in Preston Hollow

When I was on Dittmar Place yesterday, I had a little adventure. Across the cul-de-sac from the wildflowers sign, there was an unmarked asphalt path, leading into some wilderness.

After I entered the wooded area, the path curved to the left. Not long after the asphalt gave way to dirt, I spotted this.

When I showed the photo above to a couple of colleagues, one asked if it was a sculpture; the other thought it might have been part of a shed. Actually, it was the end of a bridge.

“This is so bizarre,” I thought. “Am I trespassing?” There were no signs anywhere, so I kept going. As Andy Dufresne said, “If you’ve come this far, maybe you’re willing to come a little further.” I crossed the bridge, went up the stairs on the other side, and followed a concrete path as it, again, curved to the left. Then I saw this.

Let me introduce you to the most secluded but (presumably) public tennis courts in Dallas. Judging from the surface’s condition, I might have been the first person to lay eyes on these courts in 10 years. As far as I can tell, the only way to access them (other than my path through the wilderness) is a gate just to the right of this photo that leads to the back side of the Pershing Elementary School campus. Does anyone use these courts? Or, as one of my reporters theorized, did I just publicize the prime teenage make-out spot in Preston Hollow?

2 thoughts on “I Chose My Own Adventure in Preston Hollow

  • May 12, 2012 at 11:08 am
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    So… you found Netherland Park? Not well known, since the Dallas Parks website is probably the most useless, non-informative website ever. First time I realized it was there was from using Google Maps to find parks in the area, since the parks department is useless. The courts are clearly visible in the maps, but I’ve never used them — don’t know if they’re accessible from the school that abuts the park.

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  • May 12, 2012 at 1:45 pm
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    Netherland Park is usually pretty deserted. No one really uses it and the local residents like it that way. It’s like their own private park that they don’t have to mow or water.

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